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  • This Day in Crime History

    October 21: 2005: Terry and Darlene Anderson were bludgeoned to death in their Mongo, IN home. Sadly, it is still unsolved. If anyone has any information at all, no matter how small, please contact them or even Crimestoppers (800)342-STOP or Sheriff Terry Martin LaGrange County Sheriff Dept. tmartin@lagrangesd.com

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    Please remember when leaving a comment on my blog that all comments are subject to the blog owners discretion. I do believe in freedom of speech, however, that right is not absolute. Here are the rules: 1 - Please remember the victim(s) first and foremost. Do not come here to comment only on the offender(s). My blog focuses on the victim(s). Do not glorify the killer(s). No negative comments about the victim. NO VICTIM BLAMING. 2 - I will not tolerate hate filled speech, vulgar or derogatory remarks about a victim. I will remove comments that go against this. I will not remove comments just because they do not match my beliefs, in fact, I welcome them! However, that being said, I will remove those that I find offensive, argumentative just for the sake of starting an argument that does not add to the post, hate-filled speech, etc. 3-No comments in ALL CAPS, or CoMeNtS. They are rude and difficult to read. I have had many complaints about it so no more. 4-Comments must be in English only and easy to read (meaning no text language, shortening words, etc.). Have respect for those who don't do text messaging or other lingo. 5 - ALL COMMENTS LEFT BY COMMENTORS ARE THEIR OWN AND THEIR OPINIONS. THEY DO NOT CONSTITUTE FACTS. NOR IS THE BLOG OWNER RESPONSIBLE FOR ANYONE'S OPINIONS OR FEELINGS. STATEMENTS MADE AS COMMENTS ARE OPINIONS, GIVEN FREELY BY THE COMMENTORS. If you have a question or problem with this, please feel free to email me (there is a link to my email above).

Deadly Girlfriends: Linda Lizette Lerma charged with shooting her boyfriend, Joseph Daniel Malloy, and killing him


Joseph Daniel Malloy

Joseph Daniel Malloy obituary
Girlfriend arrested in Liverpool man’s death
Liverpool man shot dead by girlfriend
Woman charged with murder after shooting live-in boyfriend to death in Brazoria County
Facebook: Joseph Malloy
MyDeathSpace: Joseph Daniel Malloy, 32, was shot and killed by his fiancee

INMATE INFORMATION

Offender Name: LERMA, LINDA LIZETTE
Custody Status: In Custody
Age: 29
Location: BRAZORIA COUNTY JAIL
Race: White
Contact Facility: BRAZORIA COUNTY JAIL
Notify Me of Status Changes
More Info

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Monsters Among Us: Rhine Antonio Reynolds killed Sophia Arthur and left her body on the bank of the Mississippi River; Sentenced to LWOP

From Reynolds appeal: What is not in dispute is that the decomposing body of the victim Sophia Arnold was found on April 12 2007 behind the Mississippi River levee in West Baton Rouge Parish However the factual version put forth by defendant is that on April 10 2007 at approximately 100 pm defendant picked up the victim at the
Southern University campus Defendant drove Ms Arnold to a residence in the vicinity of Greenwell Springs Road and Joor Road where she danced for a group of men for approximately 45 minutes Defendant then took Ms Arnold to his residence in the Sherwood Forest area of East Baton Rouge Parish

After they arrived at defendant’s residence defendant and Ms Arnold became involved in a physical altercation after an argument over payment for her dancing According to defendant he grabbed Ms Arnold by the neck and held her for five to ten minutes after which time her body became limp Defendant then placed Ms Arnold’s body in the back of his truck and drove to a location in Port Allen where he concealed the body behind the levee The ensuing investigation pointed to defendant and he was
eventually charged with second degree murder in West Baton Rouge Parish

Arrest Made in the Death of a Southern University Co-ed
Suspect pleads guilty to SU murder
State of Louisiana v Rhine Reynolds 2010 (conviction and sentence affirmed)
Rhine Reynolds v Burl Cain, Warden 20104 (habeas corpus denied)
Countless Fugitives

Movies/Documentaries
Killer Instinct with Chris Hansen: Cherokee

INMATE INFORMATION

Offender Name: REYNOLDS, RHINE
Custody Status: In Custody
Age: 46
Location: Louisiana State Penitentiary
Race: African American
Contact Facility: Louisiana Department of Corrections

Cold Case: Psycho For Love: Scott Purk killed his pregnant wife, Margaret, trying to make it look like a suicide; Sentenced to life in prison


Margaret Purk

Husband Scott Purk charged with murder in 1985 death of Akron woman
Stow arsonist fighting charges that accuse him of killing his pregnant wife in 1985
Violent strangling detailed in 1985 cold-case murder of pregnant Akron woman as trial begins
Trial to begin for man accused of killing wife 30 years ago
Witness in trial of man charged with killing his pregnant wife 30 years ago says she was not suicidal
Jury finds Scott Purk guilty of strangling his wife in 30-year-old crime
Man found guilty of murdering pregnant wife in 1985 cold case
Ohio jury convicts man for 1985 murder of pregnant wife
Man sentenced for strangling pregnant wife in 1985 cold-case murder

Movies/Documentaries
Deadline: Crime with Tamron Hall: Speaking From the Grave

INMATE INFORMATION

SCOTT DAVID PURK
Number A634667
DOB 10/12/1962
Gender Male
Race White
Admission Date 02/01/2013
Institution Pickaway Correctional Institution
Status INCARCERATED

Murder In The Family: Dawson Andrew McGehee stabbed his mother, Kathleen Karen “Katy” McGehee, to death; Sentenced to 16 years to life in prison

From McGehee’s appeal: In October 2011, defendant lived with his mother and father, Kathleen and Thomas McGehee, in Manteca.2  He was 26 years old.  While defendant previously worked as a music instructor and server at a local restaurant, his employment “ground to a halt” earlier in the year.  Defendant’s younger sister, Katelyn, also lived at the house, having moved back home the previous month after completing a master’s degree program.  Thomas frequently traveled for business and was out of town during the latter part of October.

On Friday, October 28, Katelyn went to a weekend church retreat with her friend, Samantha.  Defendant was home when Samantha came to pick Katelyn up.  Despite the fact defendant and Samantha “had been good friends and he had previously been a groomsman in her ․ wedding,” defendant “seemed like he wasn’t very comfortable” talking to her and “ended up leaving pretty quickly.”  Before Katelyn left for the retreat, her mother agreed to pick her up at the University of the Pacific (UOP) in Stockton the following Sunday, October 30.  The plan was for Katelyn to call her mother about an hour before she arrived at the school.

The morning of October 30, Kathleen went to church with one of defendant’s older brothers, Justin, and his family.  Sometime during the day, she called another of defendant’s older brothers, Colin, and left him a voicemail.  Colin returned her call around 4:00 p.m. She was making jambalaya for a potluck the following day and needed instructions on how to use the rice cooker Colin left at his parents’ house when he moved out.  The potluck was part of a victims advocacy training program;  Kathleen signed up to become a volunteer advocate in the program through her church.  Colin provided his mother with the requested instructions.  Kathleen mentioned during the phone call that she planned to pick Katelyn up that evening.  Colin described his mother’s mood as “very good.”

Around 5:00 p.m., Katelyn called her mother to let her know she was about an hour away from UOP. There was no answer so Katelyn left a message on the home answering machine.  A few minutes later, she received a call from defendant’s cell phone, but the call ended “almost immediately.”  Katelyn thought the call was a mistake because defendant “almost never” called her, so she did not try to call him back.  Instead, she called her mother’s cell phone, which also went unanswered.  Katelyn left a voicemail.  About a minute later, she received another call from defendant, who claimed he was “just calling to see how [she was].”  Katelyn told him she had been trying to reach their mother to pick her up.  Defendant responded:  “Oh, yeah, I think the home phone hasn’t really been working.”  Katelyn said she also tried their mother’s cell phone.  Defendant responded:  “Oh, yeah, I don’t think that’s been working, either.  I think she’s having trouble with those two.”  Assuming defendant was home, Katelyn asked him to find out whether their mother was still coming to pick her up.  Defendant replied sternly:  “I’m not at home, Katelyn.  I’m not at home.”  Katelyn then asked defendant whether their mother asked him to pick her up.  Defendant denied having been asked to do so before ending the call.  Katelyn found the conversation to be “bizarre” because defendant rarely called her, and especially not “to just chat.”  A couple minutes later, Katelyn tried the home phone again and left another message.

Closer to 6:00 p.m., as Katelyn was approaching UOP, she called the home phone three more times, leaving a final message, and also tried her mother’s cell phone once more.  Two minutes after Katelyn’s last message on the answering machine, defendant again called her.  This time, defendant said:  “Oh, you know what?  We actually sort of talked about that, like maybe we had talked about maybe I could come pick you up.”  Defendant also “made a few remarks about how [their mother] had just been seeming kind of tired that day.”  Katelyn agreed to have defendant pick her up and hung up the phone.

Kathleen was murdered in her bedroom sometime between her conversation with Colin and Katelyn’s missed calls.  She was stabbed ten times in the neck, chest, and abdomen.  There was also evidence of neck compression.  Strong circumstantial evidence pointed to defendant as the murderer, including the fact the jacket defendant was wearing when he was arrested two days later had his mother’s blood on it, there was no sign of a break-in at the house, Kathleen’s bedroom was “neat, orderly, nothing appeared to have been taken or broken,” defendant was the only other family member at the house that weekend, the strange phone calls between defendant and Katelyn described above, and his equally strange and incriminating behavior after he picked her up at UOP, which we recount immediately below.

Defendant’s Attempts to Prevent Discovery of the Body

Katelyn’s friend Samantha and Samantha’s husband, Ben, waited with Katelyn until defendant arrived at about 6:30 p.m. Katelyn and Samantha were walking another girl to her apartment near the UOP campus when defendant pulled into the parking lot.  Defendant engaged in “small talk” with Ben while he waited for Katelyn to get back, but Ben “got the impression he didn’t want to really talk.”  When Katelyn and Samantha returned and joined the conversation, defendant “started looking elsewhere” and “seemed uncomfortable.”  Samantha and Ben then helped Katelyn get her bags loaded into defendant’s car.

As defendant and Katelyn drove away, defendant said he had “some errands” to run, including picking up his “medicine,” which Katelyn understood to be marijuana.  Katelyn assumed these would be local errands.  Instead, defendant got on the freeway and headed north to Sacramento.  During the drive, defendant seemed “more social” than he had been in recent years.  Katelyn described:  “He actually seemed like he was in a good mood.  He seemed cheerful.  He was talkative and chatty and just seeming like very casual.”  Defendant talked “positively” about their mother, saying:  “Oh, yeah, she’s been doing great on her diet.  She’s lost 21 pounds in the last four weeks, but this diet she’s doing it’s only like 500 calories a day.  She’s been acting really tired lately.  I think it’s not enough calories for her.  She’s been seeming really tired.”

At some point, Katelyn mentioned her lips were chapped.  Defendant offered to stop at a drugstore so she could pick up some Blistex, which surprised Katelyn because defendant rarely offered to do things for people, at least during the previous few months.  When defendant stopped at a Walgreens in Sacramento, Katelyn went inside, bought the Blistex, and used the restroom at the store.  She then returned to the car, but defendant was not there.  Katelyn found defendant inside the store, “sort of pacing the aisles.”

After Walgreens, defendant and Katelyn drove to a fast food restaurant to get some food.  They ate in the car on the way to pick up the marijuana, but defendant appeared to be lost.  He apologized and said:  “I usually come out here in the daylight, but it’s dark this time, so I’m—it’s throwing me off a little bit.”  After about an hour of “driving up and down ․ the same few streets,” Katelyn asked defendant:  “Is there a specific street that you’re looking for?”  They arrived at the apparent destination soon thereafter, which was “maybe a minute or two away” from where they started at the Walgreens.  Defendant parked at a Mexican restaurant and said:  “I know this might seem a little strange, but Mom understands.  We’ve done this before.  I need to park here and walk to where I’m going to go.”  Katelyn stayed in the car and locked the doors.  Defendant returned from wherever he went about 20 minutes later and said he vomited during the walk back to the car.

Defendant then drove Katelyn back to their home in Manteca, arriving just before 11:00 p.m., about four hours after they left UOP. Katelyn unloaded her bags in her room and then walked to the bathroom.  Defendant stopped her in the hallway and said:  “Katelyn, Mom’s asleep.”  Katelyn described his tone as “abrupt and urgent.”  She found the warning to be strange since she assumed their mother was asleep and did not normally bother her in the middle of the night.  Katelyn used the bathroom and then returned to her room.  At various points later in the night, she left her room and found defendant “sort of pacing in the hallways.”

The next morning, defendant was already up when Katelyn emerged from her room.  He asked whether she got his text message.  Katelyn’s cell phone died the night before, so she had not.  Defendant explained he texted her earlier in the morning to say their mother got up at 5:00 or 6:00 a.m. and told him she had not slept well so she would be staying in bed for the day.  When defendant went outside for a few minutes, Katelyn knocked lightly on their mother’s door and called for her, but did not receive a response.  She tried to open the door, but it was locked.  Concerned, but also conflicted because of what defendant told her about their mother not sleeping well the night before, Katelyn knocked a little louder and again called for her mother, but again received no response.  Katelyn then went outside to try to look into her mother’s window, but the shutters were closed.  Feeling like she was being “paranoid” because she did not have any reason to disbelieve defendant, Katelyn returned to her room.  She then went about her day.

At defendant’s suggestion, which he claimed was a request their mother made earlier that morning, defendant drove Katelyn to the bank so she could take care of an errand there.  Katelyn described his demeanor as “much like the previous night,” explaining:  “He was being unusually, you know, cheerful, seeming—being chatty and just, you know, eager to have conversations, and just being very casual.”  After Katelyn was done at the bank, defendant asked if she needed to go anywhere else, suggesting Target.  Katelyn said she did not need to go to Target and asked if he did.  Defendant answered:  “Not really.  Just for fun.  Just to go walk around Target.”  Katelyn then asked to go to the AT & T store located on the way back to the house to buy a phone charger.  Defendant suggested they go to a different AT & T store farther away from the house.  After picking up the charger, they returned home.  Katelyn then went out to lunch with a friend.  When she returned later in the afternoon, defendant was not home.

Around 5:30 p.m., still seeing no sign of her mother, Katelyn decided to check on her again.  Knocking on her door and calling for her, progressively louder with each attempt, Katelyn again received no response.  She then called her brother Justin, who told her to call 911, which she did.  Emergency responders arrived a short time later, broke the lock off the bedroom door, and found Kathleen’s body in the condition previously described.  Police were then dispatched to the scene.  Defendant was arrested early the next morning.  As mentioned, his mother’s blood was on his jacket when he was taken into custody.

Manteca Woman Stabbed To Death; Son Accused
Family grieves for slain mom, struggles to understand the son who killed her
Police recover bloody mask
Jury finds man sane in mother’s stabbing death
Man gets life for killing his mom
16 years to life for man who killed his mom
The People of the State of California v Dawson Andrew McGehee 2016 (conviction and sentence affirmed)

Movies/Documentaries
Snapped: Dawson McGehee

INMATE INFORMATION

Inmate Name MCGEHEE, DAWSON ANDREW
CDCR Number AN4127
Age 32
Admission Date 02/05/2013
Current Location Mule Creek State Prison
Parole Eligible Date (Month/Year) 09/2024

Psycho For Love: Vincent Bauer killed his estranged wife, Susan Bauer; Sentenced to life in prison

From Bauer’s appeal: In the early morning hours of March 20, 1996, 5-year-old Jonathan Bauer knocked on the back door of his neighbors’ house in Saint Paul. After being let into the house, Jonathan told his neighbor that something was wrong with his mother, Susan Bauer.   The neighbor’s husband went next door to investigate.

The front door to Ms. Bauer’s house was open and a set of keys was in the outside lock.   Upon entering the house, the neighbor found appellant, Ms. Bauer’s estranged husband, standing in the doorway between the living room and kitchen with appellant’s and Ms. Bauer’s other two children.   He then saw Ms. Bauer, obviously injured or dead, lying on a sofa bed in the living room.   The neighbor called 911 from the phone in Ms. Bauer’s kitchen.   The paramedics arrived at Ms. Bauer’s house shortly thereafter.   After briefly examining Ms. Bauer, they concluded that she was already dead.

Saint Paul police and Dr. Michael McGee, an Assistant Ramsey County Medical Examiner, were called to the scene.   They found Ms. Bauer on the sofa bed in the living room.   A telephone cord and a metal coat hanger had been wrapped tightly around her neck.   In addition to the injuries caused by these ligatures, investigators observed multiple soft tissue injuries on Ms. Bauer’s face, neck, chest, and hands, and an L-shaped abrasion on her left calf.   After conducting an autopsy, Dr. McGee determined that the cause of Ms. Bauer’s death was “[a]sphyxia due to ligature strangulation” and that Ms. Bauer was most likely killed between 10:00 p.m. on March 19 and 12:00 midnight on March 20, 1996.

Appellant did not testify at trial, but in several interviews with police gave his version of the events surrounding Ms. Bauer’s killing.   Appellant and Ms. Bauer began dating in 1984, were married in 1988, and separated in early 1996.   They had three children.   In January 1996, Ms. Bauer filed for and was granted an order for protection prohibiting appellant from having contact with her.   Despite this order, Ms. Bauer willingly continued to have contact with appellant and permitted him to have contact with the children.

Appellant said that he was at Ms. Bauer’s house on the afternoon of March 19, 1996 but left at approximately 2:30 p.m. He said that from there, he went to a dentist’s office in Newport where Ms. Bauer had a dentist appointment.   Appellant stated that from the dentist’s office, he went to a shopping mall in West Saint Paul where he purchased clothes for his children and then went to a bar in North Saint Paul where he played pool until late in the night.   After leaving the bar, he went to the trailer home of a friend in Oakdale, where he was residing.   One of the other tenants of the trailer confirmed that appellant returned there at approximately 12:15 a.m. on March 20.

Appellant said that he went to Ms. Bauer’s house on the morning of March 20 to drop off the clothes he had purchased for his children.   According to appellant, when he arrived at Ms. Bauer’s house he saw the front door open.   Appellant said that he then entered the house and saw Ms. Bauer lying on the sofa bed.   He touched Ms. Bauer’s face to see if she was all right, but found that she was already dead.   Appellant said that he then sent one of his children to the neighbor’s house for help while he got the other children dressed.

When asked if he knew who had killed his wife, appellant told the police that he suspected Quang Tran, the boyfriend of Rebecca Haas, a friend of Ms. Bauer’s.   Appellant suggested that Tran was upset with Ms. Bauer for interfering in Tran’s and Haas’ relationship.

At appellant’s trial, the jury heard of several instances of Tran’s past violent behavior.   Both the defense and the state placed particular emphasis on the events of March 17, 1996, two to three days before Ms. Bauer’s killing.   On that date, Tran called Ms. Bauer’s house several times looking for Haas. When Ms. Bauer informed him that Haas was not there, Tran became angry and threatened to kill both Haas and Ms. Bauer.   Ms. Bauer then called the police, who arrived and took a statement from Ms. Bauer.   Sometime after the phone calls, Haas and her children arrived at Ms. Bauer’s house for dinner.   After dinner, as Haas was preparing to leave, Tran arrived at Ms. Bauer’s house and began smashing the windows of Haas’ car with a hammer.   Ms. Bauer called the police, but Tran fled before they arrived.   Haas gave the police Tran’s address, but Tran was not at home when officers went there to investigate.

According to police records, at 11:45 p.m. that same evening, Ms. Bauer called 911 and reported having just heard a window break in the front of her house.   Police records indicate that an officer was dispatched to Ms. Bauer’s house at 11:53 p.m. and arrived at 11:56 p.m. The officer discovered that a piece of brick with a note attached had been thrown through Ms. Bauer’s window.   The unsigned note read:

My Family not you bisness.   You F**k with me to much time.   My kid say you no have husband no mor So you lonely me and my Friend come F**k you OK? He have long hair you like him. you stay away bich or I F**k you OK. I not joking.

Ms. Bauer said that she suspected Tran had written the note.   The officer attempted to locate Tran at Haas’ house, but Tran was not there.

On the morning of March 20, after discovering Ms. Bauer’s body, the police located Tran and interviewed him in connection with the March 17 brick throwing incident and Ms. Bauer’s killing.   Tran told the officers that he was at work from approximately 11:00 p.m. on March 17 to approximately 7:00 a.m. on March 18.   Tran’s employer verified that computer records from March 17 indicated that Tran’s electronic access card had been used at Tran’s place of employment multiple times during that time period.   As for the evening of Ms. Bauer’s killing, March 19, Tran told the police that he was at home watching videos.

Tran was arrested but was released shortly thereafter because of a lack of evidence.   Prior to releasing Tran, the police obtained a blood sample, searched his residence, and seized his jacket, which appeared to have a small amount of blood on the sleeve.

From Ms. Bauer’s house, the police seized several pieces of evidence including the sheets from the sofa bed, a piece of cardboard that had been lying on or near the sofa bed, and samples of what appeared to be blood from the wall and floor of a bedroom adjoining the room where Ms. Bauer’s body was found.   The police also took samples of what appeared to be blood from several locations on Ms. Bauer’s body.

With appellant’s consent, the police searched his residence and obtained blood, hair, and saliva samples from him.   In appellant’s residence, the police found and seized a pair of men’s underwear with what appeared to be blood on it.   In the course of their investigation the police also seized three leg braces-two for the right leg and one for the left leg-that belonged to appellant.   Appellant had polio as a child and needed the braces to walk.

Tests conducted by the Minnesota Bureau of Criminal Apprehension (BCA) showed the presence of blood on the piece of cardboard, sheets, wall sample, and floor scraping taken from Ms. Bauer’s house as well as on several swabs from Ms. Bauer’s body.   Tests also confirmed the presence of blood on Tran’s jacket sleeve and on the underwear taken from appellant’s residence.   No blood was discovered on any of the leg braces.

The BCA conducted DNA testing of the blood.   The sample from Tran’s jacket yielded no interpretable results.   DNA from the blood on appellant’s underwear “matched” Ms. Bauer’s DNA profile.   A BCA analyst testified that such a profile occurs in approximately 1 in 339,000 Caucasians.   At least some of the DNA from the samples from Ms. Bauer’s right hand, her left hand, the sheets, the cardboard, and the wall also matched Ms. Bauer’s DNA profile.   Tests indicated that some of these items also contained the blood of a second person.   Neither Tran nor appellant could be positively identified as the source of any of the blood on any of these samples.   According to the BCA, however, Tran, but not appellant, could be excluded as the second source of blood on the sample from Ms. Bauer’s left hand.

Dr. McGee’s autopsy revealed additional evidence linking appellant to Ms. Bauer’s killing.   During the autopsy, Dr. McGee observed and photographed an L-shaped abrasion on Ms. Bauer’s left calf that had been inflicted near the time of Ms. Bauer’s death.   Subsequent to his autopsy, Dr. McGee compared the scaled photograph of this abrasion to the hinges of the right leg braces seized from appellant.   From this comparison, Dr. McGee concluded that the L-shaped abrasion was caused by “either [appellant’s] brace or one of similar configuration and manufacture.”

St. Paul man denies he killed wife as he’s sentenced to life in prison
State of Minnesota v Vincent Stephen Bauer 1999 (conviction and sentence affirmed)
St. Paul man denies he killed wife as he’s sentenced to life in prison (about 1/2 down, within the article)

Movies/Documentaries
Killer Instinct with Chris Hansen: Killers Imprint

INMATE INFORMATION

Demographic Information
MNDOC Offender ID: 195884
Name: Vincent Stephen Bauer
Birth Date: 01/25/1962
Current Status: Incarcerated as of 02/03/1998. Currently at MCF Rush City.
Sentence Date: 02/02/1998
Anticipated Release Date: Life – Contact co-records.doc@state.mn.us for release information.
Expiration Date: Life
Caseworker: William Aagaard (320) 358-0510
Current Offense Information
Highest Ranked Offense: Homicide
Court File Number(s): Ramsey – KX971838

Update: Colleen Hufford murder *Alton Alexander Nolen convicted; Jury recommends death penalty*

Vaughn Foods victims

Victims
Colleen Hufford
Traci Johnson (survived)

Monsters Among Us: Alton Nolen charged with killing Colleen Hufford and injuring another after being fired from Vaughan Foods; Faces the death penalty
Alton Nolen: 5 Fast Facts You Need to Know
Timeline of events leading up to Alton Nolen murder trial
Gruesome Opening Statements In Alton Nolen Trial
GRAPHIC: Survivor testifies about moment she was attacked by Oklahoma beheading suspect
Witnesses to Moore beheading kick off testimony in Alton Nolen trial
‘She did her best to ward off her attacker,’ doctor says of Moore beheading victim
Jurors hear interviews with Alton Nolen explaining why he beheaded co-worker
Two Doctors Say Alton Nolen Was Mentally Ill When Beheading Victim
Jurors To Decide If Beheading Defendant Is Intellectually Disabled
Jury finds man guilty in Moore beheading; Victim’s family calls for death penalty
Beheading suspect Alton Nolen found guilty on all counts, including first-degree murder
Jury recommends death in Oklahoma beheading case
Jury Recommends Death Penalty For Alton Nolen
Jury recommends death penalty for Alton Nolen murder conviction
Wikipedia: Vaughan Foods beheading incident

INMATE INFORMATION

Monsters Among Us: Karl Myers killed 2 women, Shawn Marie Williams and Cindy Michelle Marzano; Sentenced to death; Also a suspect in others

Victims
Shawn Marie Williams, 22 [4/16/1993]
Cindy Michelle Marzano, 29 [3/15/1996]
Lori Lee Farmer, 8 [6/13/1977] suspect
Michelle Heather Guse, 9 [6/13/1977] suspect
Doris Denise Milner, 10 [6/13/1977] suspect

From Myers’ appeal: The victim, Cindy Marzano, and Appellant were acquaintances. She left home for work on March 14, 1996, bearing no bruises or wounds on her face or head.   She drove her 1984 silver Chevrolet Impala to work for her 1:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. shift.   While at work she spoke to Appellant twice between 7:00 p.m. and 8:00 p.m. and was overheard agreeing to meet Appellant after work.   She checked out at 9:09 p.m. and was seen thereafter at Denny’s restaurant where she and a man remained about thirty (30) minutes.

At 11:51 p.m., Appellant was at a convenience store, where he had been a regular customer, and remained two to two and one-half hours.   He washed his truck while there and told the clerk he had been at a relative’s house.   At 12:30 a.m., Cindy Marzano was found floating face down in the water at the Highway 33 Landing on the navigation channel near the Port of Catoosa.   Her blouse and bra were pulled up and she had bruises on her forehead, upper left arm and neck.   She had cuts on her face and an abrasion between her shoulder blades.   She had bruises on her right thigh and left leg.   These injuries were suffered prior to death.   Asphyxiation was determined to be the cause of death.   DNA testing established that spermatozoa found in her vagina matched Appellant’s DNA.

Appellant first denied that he had seen the victim that night.   He finally admitted talking to the victim that night at her work.   He said they agreed to meet at Denny’s for coffee, and he was home by 11:45 p.m. He denied any physical contact with the victim.   He later admitted to having consensual sex with the victim that night.

Inmate Sidney Byrd testified that Appellant admitted killing two women, and further admitted that (concerning Cindy Marzano) “he was fucking her from behind when he strangled her and she died.”

Find-A-Grave: Shawn Marie Williams
Find-A-Grave: Cindy Michelle Miller Marzano
Hunch Leads to Slaying Suspect’s Arrest
Arrest Puts Light on Unsolved Killings
Myers Found Guilty in Murder of Marzano
Jury convicts man of woman’s death
Karl Lee Myers v State of Oklahoma 2000 (conviction and sentence affirmed)
Oklahoma death-row inmate dies of suspected natural causes
Man Convicted Of Broken Arrow Murder Dies In Prison
Murderpedia: Karl Lee Myers
Karl Myers – Oklahoma
The Girl Scout Murders
Girl Scout Murders: 40 years later and new eyes are looking at the notorious case

Movies/Documentaries
Swamp Murders: Lost Highway

INMATE INFORMATION

Offender: Karl L. Myers
OK DOC#: 78224
Status: INACTIVE

Appearance
Gender: Male
Race: White
Height: 6 ft 0 in
Weight: 182 lbs
Hair Color: Brown
Eye Color: Brown

Alias
Earl L. Myers

IDs
OK DOC#: 78224
Birth Date: 3/29/1948

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